Spate of murderous attacks in Karachi

 

Ahmadis in Karachi had a very rough time this year. Their opponents went to the extreme; they took to target-killing. At one time their score averaged one per week. We first enter the reports of various incidents as they happened and were reported by us in our monthly reports. A few comments will be made at the end. Below is a clipping from a calendar published by anti-Ahmadi clerics inciting the public to wage war against Ahmadis.

Ahmadi murdered for his faith

Karachi; January 18, 2012:   Mr. Ahsan Kamal S/O Mr. Zafar Iqbal, aged 30 was murdered by unknown persons on January 18, 2012 at 4:30 p.m.

He was working in a franchise of Warid Company when assailants entered the shop and shot him twice. They left the scene without looting anything from the shop.

Mr. Kamal was a harmless man who had no personal issues with anyone. He was an active member of the Ahmadiyya community. He is survived by his parents, a brother and three sisters.

There is evidence of involvement by jihadist organizations in his murder. The police are reluctant to proceed with this case.

Mr. Kamal had donated his eyes in his will; these were given to a deserving applicant after his death.

 

Prominent Ahmadi killed for his faith

Karachi, July 19, 2012:          Mr. Naeem Ahmad Gondal S/O Ch. Abdul Wahid, the president of the local Ahmadiyya community in Orangi Town, Karachi was shot dead by two unknown men on July 19, 2012, when he was going to work in the morning.

It was a case of target killing. He left home at about 08:00 as per routine to catch the office van from a nearby stop. He was intercepted by the assailants who shot him through the head. The bullet entered from the right side and emerged from the left.

Mr. Gondal was 52 years old and is survived by his wife. He had no personal enemies and was respected in the neighbourhood. He had Master’s degree in Economics and Business Administration, and worked as an Assistant Director in the State Bank of Pakistan. He served the Ahmadiyya community as the local president for past eleven years.

The situation is tough for Ahmadis in Orangi Town for a long time. Anti-Ahmadiyya wall-chalking is prolific there. Earlier this year an Ahmadi was murdered for his faith in Manzoor Colony. Another Ahmadi was injured grievously in Karachi a few months ago.

 

A spate of Ahmadis’ murders in Karachi for their faith

Karachi:          Four Ahmadis were murdered in Karachi within a period of ten days during September.

    1.           I.         Rao Abdul Ghaffar of Baldia Town was murdered on September 6, 2012 by target-killers. He was a teacher by profession. While returning home from school, he was attacked by two persons and shot dead. Mr. Ghaffar was 44, married and had four children; the eldest is 16 years old. Mr. Ghaffar enjoyed a good reputation as a person and a teacher. His record of voluntary community services was excellent.
    2.        II.         Mr. Muhammad Nawaz was killed at about 20:00 on September 11, 2012 while driving to his place of duty. Unknown killers shot him twice in the head; he died on the spot. Mr. Nawaz was a good and helpful man. He is survived by his widow, two sons, three daughters and an elderly mother.
    3.     III.         Mr. Naveed Ahmad, 22, was attacked in his neighbourhood while sitting outside in company with friends, on September 14, 2012. Two unknown motor-cyclists approached them and fired shots from close range. Mr. Ahmad was hit twice in the stomach. He died on his way to hospital. His friends were hurt but survived.

  1.     IV.         Mr. Muhammad Ahmad Siddiqui was subjected to a target-killing on September 15, 2012 at about midnight. He closed his shop and was on his way home with his brother-in-law, Mr. Shams Fakhri. It seems someone reported their departure on a cell-phone to the killers who were waiting for their targets not too far away. Mr. Siddiqui and Mr. Fakhri were both hit with bullets. Mr. Siddiqui died, while Mr. Fakhri was operated upon for removal of bullets. The latter lost lot of blood in the process and his condition became critical; fortunately he survived.

It is learnt that a mulla Aziz was present at some distance when they closed their store. He phoned someone at the time. Mr. Siddiqui and some other members of his family joined Ahmadiyyat in 2001. This had caused a reaction in their circle of acquaintances.

Mr. Siddiqui was 23; he got married (Nikah) only a week earlier. He was the youngest of his 11 brothers and sisters. Two of his brothers are settled in the USA.

 

Target-killing of Ahmadis goes on in Karachi during October

October 2012: Five Ahmadis, including three in Karachi were killed by unknown killers this month. Last month four Ahmadis were likewise murdered in Karachi. No arrests have been made. Incidents for the month of October are briefly described below.

  1. Mr. Saad Farooq, 26, was killed in Baldia Town, Karachi on October 19, 2012 when his family convoy was driving back home from their mosque after the Friday congregational prayers. Mr. Farooq was riding a motor cycle. Unknown men on a motor cycle approached him from behind, shot him in the head, and he died on the spot. They then fired at a car in which Mr. Farooq’s father, brother, father-in-law and others were seated. The three were injured and taken to a hospital.

A few months ago, the president of the Ahmadiyya community Baldia Town was killed by target-killers.

Mr. Saad Farooq was an active member of the Karachi Ahmadi community. He had only recently been married a few days before. His bride of three days is now a widow.

II&III   Two more Ahmadis, Raja Abdul Hamid Khan and Mr. Bashir Ahmad were killed in Baldia Town four days later, on October 23, 2012.

Raja Abdul Hameed Khan, 40, a homeopath was shot dead at night in his clinic. Ten minutes later, Mr. Bashir Ahmad, 70, owner of a general store shop was shot dead, perhaps by the same people.

 

Ahmadi succumbs to injuries

Karachi; November 27, 2012:           Chaudhry Nusrat Mahmood, a 68-year-old Ahmadi, who was critically injured in the October 19 attack, succumbed to his injuries after more than a month in hospital. He was driving back home in the company of his relatives after offering his Friday prayers when unidentified assailants started firing at them. Mr. Mahmood’s son-in-law Saad Farooq was killed in that attack. Saad’s father, Farooq Ahmed Kahlon, and his brother, Ammad Farooq, were also injured.

Mr. Mahmood lived in New York and had come to Karachi for his daughter’s wedding with Saad Farooq which took place only three days before the attack.

The Director of Public Affairs for Ahmadiyya Jamaat Mr. Saleemuddin reiterated that the hate campaign against the Ahmadiyya community has continued while the administration has taken no action and none of the involved criminals had faced justice; this was one of the major factors in increased violence against the community. “We have brought this to the notice of authorities, but to little avail,” he stated.

The above reports show that all the Ahmadis murdered in Karachi were target killed by sharp shooters and trained criminals. Most of the targets were active members of the local Ahmadi communities, including two who were presidents. Two among the martyred were youth who had married very recently which makes their death even more mournful and even sadistic, as the killers must have been aware of this aspect of their personal lives. Most of the murders were undertaken in Baldia Town/Orangi area. The Khatme Nabuwwat Organization is well entrenched and well-known in this area.

Ahmadis have been killed in Karachi for their faith since the promulgation of the anti-Ahmadi Ordinance XX. This year alone 10 Ahmadis were killed. During the months of September and October, on the average one Ahmadi was killed every week. This is a frightening experience for a small community. If Ahmadis are only 1% of the population, this rate has the same significance as 97 persons of the majority community being target-killed in Karachi per week. Of course, Ahmadis maintained their principled policy: No bloodshed even for revenge. ‘Love for All; Hatred for None’ is a demanding motto; Ahmadis have honoured their commitment to this ideal.

The Ahmadiyya Director of Public Affairs brought this killing spree to the notice of relevant authorities, but to little avail. In a recent letter he conveyed them once again that mullas openly declare Ahmadis Wajib-ul-Qatl (must be killed) in their rallies and sermons, and distribute leaflets with such edicts. They even dare print their names and addresses on these but the authorities look the other way. They seem to lack political will in disciplining these clerics. It is clear that attacks on Ahmadis are result of a deliberate conspiracy of extremist religious and anti-social elements who are busy spreading sectarian hatred in the name of religion.

It is learnt that one or more terrorists have been arrested who have confessed to the murder of some Ahmadis in addition to a few others. Let’s see if these criminals are brought to justice. Even more important is the need to find their sponsors and financers who should be made to suffer for their crimes against humanity.

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