The Media – 1998

1998

The media

The state- owned electronic media continued its complete blackout of Ahmadiyya existence in Pakistan. It drummed up, however, all the news and comments whenever there was an anti-Ahmadiyya occurrence, for example, Punjab Assembly’s resolution on change of name of Rabwah town. The English press preferred to stay generally quiet on the Ahmadiyya situation, however it did voice its opinion on the absurdity of the Resolution on Rabwah. The Urdu Press, however, continued with its anti-Ahmadiyya policy and tried to excel each other in this trend, with sale of their papers in mind. Highly inflammatory and harmful statements issued by petty mullahs were given prominent spaces on front and back pages of newspapers that claim large nation-wide circulations. For instance, the Daily Nawa-i-Waqt, Lahore carried the following headlines in a two-column report on 8 March 1998:

‘ Those who deny the Finality of Prophethood have no Right to stay in Pakistan

‘ The Time is now Ripe to wage an Open War against the enemies of Islam’ (Abdul Ghaffar Bhatti)

 

In the follow-up details it was mentioned that A.G. Bhatti, Chairman of the Ahle-Hadith Students Federation, Okara city, further stressed: ” Mirzai Community (Ahmadis) should emigrate to London, the abode of Mirza Tahir, the apostate who is the successor to their false prophet, Ghulam Ahmad, the apostate. Put them to the sword-burn their crops-demolish their places of worship, as I cannot tolerate the existence of rebels of Mohammad, the Prophet; and rebels have no right to live. It is government’s duty to cleanse this pure land of all Mirzais and do away with their false mosques, as Mirzais are the worst and the ugliest traitors to Islam and Pakistan; and no Muslim can tolerate the presence of these traitors and British agents in Pakistan.”

 

The above is only a sample of what is said and printed. Sometimes the statements are uglier and filthier, which are unfit to be repeated here. It is surprising that with this kind of anti-Ahmadiyya propaganda, Ahmadis still try to maintain their presence in Pakistan. The government takes no notice of this evil; in fact it encourages it. On the other hand, Ahmadiyya news and views are either not published or unabashedly suppressed. In short, the Urdu press has acted as a veritable representative of a corrupt and decadent establishment; in fact, it has, unfortunately, helped in speeding up the downhill slide.  History will not but judge the Urdu Press of Pakistan harshly.

 

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